Liberal Peace or Liberal Diffusion?: Economic Interdependence and Third-Party Intervention in Interstate Disputes, 1870-2001

Peer-reviewed Journal Article

Aydin, Aysegul (2005) Liberal Peace or Liberal Diffusion?: Economic Interdependence and Third-Party Intervention in Interstate Disputes, 1870-2001 .

 

 

Recent work in the liberal peace research program has examined the effect of economic interdependency on conflict onset. Despite growing interest in the subject, research has largely focused on explaining the conflict propensity of trading states. Broader political implications of economic ties on state behavior have not been adequately explored. I claim that economic interconnectedness affects states’ decision to intervene in conflicts. Drawing on the insights from the trade-conflict literature, I analyze whether states perceive the conflicts of their trading partners with third-parties as a threat to their interests and attempt to protect their important economic ties by intervention. I test a multinomial choice model. The results offer strong evidence that trade dependency affects the choice of sides in conflicts: states appear to join in with their trading partners. This framework emphasizes the economic imperatives in intervention decisions highlighting political implications of foreign trade on conflict processes.

Authors

Aysegul Aydin

Aysegul Aydin

PhD student, Binghamton University