Moroccan Diaspora, Internet and National Imagination

Please note: This page refers to an event that has already taken place.

Time: Monday, 29 October 2007 09:30-11:00
Place: PRIO, Hausmanns gate 7, Oslo

The Security Programme and the Ethics, Norms & Identities Programme at PRIO welcome you to a seminar with Amina Loukili on Moroccan diaspora, Internet and national imagination. Amina Loukili is researcher and lecturer at Volda University College. The seminar is part of the project 'Arms against a Sea of Troubles'.

Please register with if you want to participate.


With large growing communities of immigrants dispersed in different parts of the world, eager to preserve their identities and cultures, the Internet has become an ideal cost-effective communication tool that facilitates interaction within the diaspora. As Moroccan immigrants seek to maintain ties with their homeland, many are increasingly embracing the Internet to produce and develop a new sense of community where they can create new discourses about identity, belonging and citizenship. For this purpose, they have established electronic portals, forums, blogs, online magazines and other electronic networks to maintain connections with national groups all over the world.

Yabiladi (My Country in Arabic) is one of the most popular Internet portals established by a group of Moroccan immigrants to foster connections among the Moroccan community. This paper will study the community building aspects through Yabiladi in particular, on a more general background of the new possibilities, embedded in the Internet, which did not exist before for Moroccan immigrants. Tired of the official media’s stonewalling and governmental censorship, more and more Moroccans turn to Internet, which offers a unique environment where all kinds of topics can be discussed.

About the author:

Amina Loukili is a Moroccan journalist by training. She holds two Master’s degrees in media and communications studies from Panthéon-Assas University (Paris I), France and from Georgetown University (under the Fulbright scholarship program), Washington DC, USA. She is currently employed as a lecturer and researcher at the media department of Volda University College. Her research areas include media and journalists in the Middle-East, the independent press in Morocco, Arab diasporas and the use of the new technologies of information and communication. Before moving to Norway Amina Loukili worked as a communications consultant for the World Bank where she coordinated communications strategies and helped in developing outreach activities for the Gender and Development unit.