Moroccan tiles that could be interpreted as organic interconnectedness. . Photo: Mikołaj Pasiński / Flickr CC BY 2.0
Moroccan tiles that could be interpreted as organic interconnectedness. . Photo: Mikołaj Pasiński / Flickr CC BY 2.0

While needs keep increasing, traditional sources of humanitarian and development aid are in decline. Muslim populations across Asia, the Middle East and Africa are disproportionately affected by disasters and conflict. Muslim humanitarian an Islamic aid organization are responding to these needs through private charity and institutionalized aid. Islamic social finance has emerged as a new funding source for humanitarian and development aid. Its untapped potential is increasingly recognized by diverse international actors.

In this breakfast seminar we will take stock of this development, asking: can Muslim philanthropy and Islamic social finance contribute to fill gaps in humanitarian and development financing? Will it change humanitarian and development aid? What are the opportunities and constraints faced by the actors involved?

We will bring together academics, policymakers, and humanitarian organizations to discuss current practice and emerging trends in Muslim philanthropy and Islamic social finance.

Speakers

  • Hylmun Izhar, Senior Research Economist, Islamic Development Bank Institute (IsDBI)
  • Amelia Fauzia, Professor, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Jakarta
  • Abdulfatah Said Mohamed, Associate Professor, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha

The conversation will be moderated by Kaja Borchgrevink, Senior Researcher, PRIO.

Doors open and a light breakfast will be served from 08:30. The seminar starts at 09:00.