Strategic Rivalries in World Politics: Position, Space and Conflict Escalation

Monograph

Colaresi, Michael; Karen Rasler & William R. Thompson (2008) Strategic Rivalries in World Politics: Position, Space and Conflict Escalation. New York: Cambridge University Press.

​International conflict is neither random nor inexplicable. It is highly structured by antagonisms between a relatively small set of states that regard each other as rivals. Examining the 173 strategic rivalries in operation throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this book identifies the differences rivalries make in the probability of conflict escalation and analyzes how they interact with serial crises, arms races, alliances and capability advantages. The authors distinguish between rivalries concerning territorial disagreement (space) and rivalries concerning status and influence (position) and show how each leads to markedly different patterns of conflict escalation. They argue that rivals are more likely to engage in international conflict with their antagonists than non-rival pairs of states and conclude with an assessment of whether we can expect democratic peace, economic development and economic interdependence to constrain rivalry-induced conflict.

  • ​Develops a new approach to the study of interstate rivalries, and demonstrates how rivalry makes a significant difference in explaining conflict patterns 
  • Examines 173 international rivalries over the last two centuries, in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas 
  • Brings together different research programs on crises, militarized interstate disputes, and war.

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Authors

Michael Colaresi

Michael Colaresi

Associate Professor, Michigan State University